The Changing Climate
theliberaltony:


The 42,000 people living in Burlington, Vermont can now feel confident that when they turn on their TVs or power up their computers they are using renewable energy. With the purchase of the 7.4 megawatt Winooski One hydroelectric project earlier this month, the Burlington Electric Department now owns or contracts renewable sources — including wind, hydro, and biomass — equivalent to the city’s needs.
“We’re now in a position where we’re supplying Burlington residents with sources that are renewable,”said Ken Nolan, manager of power resources for Burlington Electric Department, earlier this month. “The prices are not tied to fossil fuels — they’re stable prices — and they provide us with the flexibility, from an environmental standpoint, to really react to any regulation or changes to environmental standards that come in the future.”
Read More

They touch on something that most forget when thinking about renewable energy v. fossil fuels, volatility of cost. 
Renewable energy has zero fluctuations in price. There is no money used for fuel to create electricity, therefore there are no fluctuations in energy costs. Fossil Fuels, on the other hand, must be purchased at market value, which means that the cost to produce electricity can change. This leads to changes in the cost to consumers.
And when was the last time you have seen the cost of fossil fuels go down over the long term? 
Wouldn’t you rather have the cost of electricity to be constant rather than a continued escalation of prices?
-The Liberal Tony 

theliberaltony:

The 42,000 people living in Burlington, Vermont can now feel confident that when they turn on their TVs or power up their computers they are using renewable energy. With the purchase of the 7.4 megawatt Winooski One hydroelectric project earlier this month, the Burlington Electric Department now owns or contracts renewable sources — including wind, hydro, and biomass — equivalent to the city’s needs.

“We’re now in a position where we’re supplying Burlington residents with sources that are renewable,”said Ken Nolan, manager of power resources for Burlington Electric Department, earlier this month. “The prices are not tied to fossil fuels — they’re stable prices — and they provide us with the flexibility, from an environmental standpoint, to really react to any regulation or changes to environmental standards that come in the future.”

Read More

They touch on something that most forget when thinking about renewable energy v. fossil fuels, volatility of cost. 

Renewable energy has zero fluctuations in price. There is no money used for fuel to create electricity, therefore there are no fluctuations in energy costs. Fossil Fuels, on the other hand, must be purchased at market value, which means that the cost to produce electricity can change. This leads to changes in the cost to consumers.

And when was the last time you have seen the cost of fossil fuels go down over the long term? 

Wouldn’t you rather have the cost of electricity to be constant rather than a continued escalation of prices?

-The Liberal Tony 

greenpeaceaustp:

Will the University of Sydney give these guys the flick?
Whitehaven Coal’s operations might seem far away to the University of Sydney management – but for the community at Maules Creek, the destruction of endangered forest, Indigenous heritage sites and prime farmland couldn’t be closer to home.
Tell university management it’s well and truly time to pull Sydney Uni money out of Whitehaven Coal » http://ift.tt/1tl6fOa

greenpeaceaustp:

Will the University of Sydney give these guys the flick?

Whitehaven Coal’s operations might seem far away to the University of Sydney management – but for the community at Maules Creek, the destruction of endangered forest, Indigenous heritage sites and prime farmland couldn’t be closer to home.

Tell university management it’s well and truly time to pull Sydney Uni money out of Whitehaven Coal » http://ift.tt/1tl6fOa

saveplanetearth:

350.org

Germany’s relentless push into renewable energy has implications far beyond its shores. By creating huge demand for wind turbines and especially for solar panels, it has helped lure big Chinese manufacturers into the market, and that combination is driving down costs faster than almost anyone thought possible just a few years ago.

Electric utility executives all over the world are watching nervously as technologies they once dismissed as irrelevant begin to threaten their long-established business plans. Fights are erupting across the United States over the future rules for renewable power. Many poor countries, once intent on building coal-fired power plants to bring electricity to their people, are discussing whether they might leapfrog the fossil age and build clean grids from the outset.

A reckoning is at hand, and nowhere is that clearer than in Germany. Even as the country sets records nearly every month for renewable power production, the changes have devastated its utility companies, whose profits from power generation have collapsed.

A similar pattern may well play out in other countries that are pursuing ambitious plans for renewable energy. Some American states, impatient with legislative gridlock in Washington, have set aggressive goals of their own, aiming for 20 or 30 percent renewable energy as soon as 2020.

saveplanetearth:

Renewable energy capacity grows at fastest ever pace: Green technologies now produce 22% of world’s electricity @ International Energy Agency via Guardian 

Unbelievable, can’t be tru!

saveplanetearth:

Renewable energy capacity grows at fastest ever pace: Green technologies now produce 22% of world’s electricity @ International Energy Agency via Guardian

Unbelievable, can’t be tru!

time-for-maps:

Share of energy from renewable sources in the European Union.

There is still a long way to go for most countries.
If you don’t want to do it for the envirenment or the climate then al least do it to become less dependent from russian natural gas.

time-for-maps:

Share of energy from renewable sources in the European Union.

There is still a long way to go for most countries.

If you don’t want to do it for the envirenment or the climate then al least do it to become less dependent from russian natural gas.

quickhits:

Study shows fossil fuels, nukes unnecessary to provide the world with energy.

PhysOrg: New research has shown that it is possible and affordable for the world to achieve 100 percent renewable energy by 2030, if there is the political will to strive for this goal.
Achieving 100 percent renewable energy would mean the building of about four million 5 MW wind turbines, 1.7 billion 3 kW roof-mounted solar photovoltaic systems, and around 90,000 300 MW solar power plants.
Mark Delucchi, one of the authors of the report, which was published in the journal Energy Policy, said the researchers had aimed to show enough renewable energy is available and could be harnessed to meet demand indefinitely by 2030.
Delucchi and colleague Mark Jacobson left all fossil fuel sources of energy out of their calculations and concentrated only on wind, solar, waves and geothermal sources. Fossil fuels currently provide over 80 percent of the world’s energy supply. They also left out biomass, currently the most widely used renewable energy source, because of concerns about pollution and land-use issues. Their calculations also left out nuclear power generation, which currently supplies around six percent of the world’s electricity.

I wasn’t extremely surprised that we could get by without fossil fuels. What got my attention was that nuclear power was left out of the equation as well. A lot of people have been trying to paint nuclear as a necessary evil, saying we’d have to use “clean” nuclear power to reduce carbon emissions. This study proves them wrong.
Turns out we can power the whole planet without using energy from an industry that produces what may be the most dangerous toxic waste known to humanity. Good to know.
[photo via Wikimedia Commons]

quickhits:

Study shows fossil fuels, nukes unnecessary to provide the world with energy.

PhysOrg: New research has shown that it is possible and affordable for the world to achieve 100 percent renewable energy by 2030, if there is the political will to strive for this goal.

Achieving 100 percent would mean the building of about four million 5 MW , 1.7 billion 3 kW roof-mounted solar photovoltaic systems, and around 90,000 300 MW solar power plants.

Mark Delucchi, one of the authors of the report, which was published in the journal , said the researchers had aimed to show enough renewable energy is available and could be harnessed to meet demand indefinitely by 2030.

Delucchi and colleague Mark Jacobson left all fossil fuel sources of energy out of their calculations and concentrated only on wind, solar, waves and geothermal sources. currently provide over 80 percent of the world’s energy supply. They also left out biomass, currently the most widely used renewable energy source, because of concerns about pollution and land-use issues. Their calculations also left out nuclear power generation, which currently supplies around six percent of the world’s electricity.

I wasn’t extremely surprised that we could get by without fossil fuels. What got my attention was that nuclear power was left out of the equation as well. A lot of people have been trying to paint nuclear as a necessary evil, saying we’d have to use “clean” nuclear power to reduce carbon emissions. This study proves them wrong.

Turns out we can power the whole planet without using energy from an industry that produces what may be the most dangerous toxic waste known to humanity. Good to know.

[photo via Wikimedia Commons]

maptitude1:

This map shows the share of electricity generated by wind power in each state (in 2013).

maptitude1:

This map shows the share of electricity generated by wind power in each state (in 2013).

thelandofmaps:

EU dependency on Russian gas [550x542]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

Way to depending on Russian gas.
Need for more renewable energy.

thelandofmaps:

EU dependency on Russian gas [550x542]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

Way to depending on Russian gas.

Need for more renewable energy.