The Changing Climate
Awesome, camping in nature and see ice bergs drift by.

Awesome, camping in nature and see ice bergs drift by.

opticallyaroused:

Outrageously Beautiful Trees

Awesome

thelandofmaps:

National/regional parks and marine protected areas of Italy [1974x2769]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

National/regional parks and marine protected areas of Italy [1974x2769]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com


Called “Mother Nature in Tears,” photographer Michael Nolan shot this amazing image while touring the largest icecap in Norway. 

Called “Mother Nature in Tears,” photographer Michael Nolan shot this amazing image while touring the largest icecap in Norway. 

mothernaturenetwork:

5 places already feeling the effects of climate changeClimate change forecasts tend to focus on how the world will look in a century, but some places need evaluation now.

mothernaturenetwork:

5 places already feeling the effects of climate change
Climate change forecasts tend to focus on how the world will look in a century, but some places need evaluation now.

Cenotes are natural pits or sinkholes resulting from the collapse of limestone bedrock that exposes groundwater underneath. Especially associated with the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico, cenotes were used by the ancient Maya for sacrificial offerings. The term derives from a word used by the low-land Yucatec Maya, “Ts’onot” to refer to any location with accessible groundwater. There are an estimated 7,000 cenotes in the Yucatán Peninsula.

Cenote water is often very clear, as the water comes from rain water filtering slowly through the ground, and therefore contains very little suspended particulate matter. The groundwater flow rate within a cenote may be very slow. In many cases, cenotes are areas where sections of cave roof have collapsed revealing an underlying cave system, and the water flow rates may be much faster: up to 6 miles (10 km) per day. Cenotes around the world attract cave divers who have documented extensive flooded cave systems through them, some of which have been explored for lengths of 62 miles (100 km) or more.

source 1, 2

Awesome

earth-phenomenon:

The Incredible Cypress Forest of Caddo Lake Louisianna
Caddo Lake (French: Lac Caddo) is a 25,400 acres (10,300 ha) lake and wetland located on the border between Texas and Louisiana, in northern Harrison County and southern Marion County in Texas and western Caddo Parish in Louisiana. The lake is named after the Southeastern culture of Native Americans called Caddoans or Caddo, who lived in the area until their expulsion in the 19th century. It is an internationally protected wetland under the RAMSAR treaty and features the largest Cypress forest in the world. According to Caddo legend, the lake was formed by the 1812 New Madrid Earthquake. There may be some truth to the legend, as Reelfoot Lake in Tennessee was formed by that earthquake, but most geologists now feel that Caddo Lake was formed gradually rather than catastrophically. The lake was formed, either gradually or catastrophically, by the “Great Raft,” a 100-mile (160-km) log jam on the Red River in Louisiana, possibly filling the basin that the intense uplift and shifting of the earthquake had created.

earth-phenomenon:

The Incredible Cypress Forest of Caddo Lake Louisianna

Caddo Lake (French: Lac Caddo) is a 25,400 acres (10,300 ha) lake and wetland located on the border between Texas and Louisiana, in northern Harrison County and southern Marion County in Texas and western Caddo Parish in Louisiana. The lake is named after the Southeastern culture of Native Americans called Caddoans or Caddo, who lived in the area until their expulsion in the 19th century. It is an internationally protected wetland under the RAMSAR treaty and features the largest Cypress forest in the world. According to Caddo legend, the lake was formed by the 1812 New Madrid Earthquake. There may be some truth to the legend, as Reelfoot Lake in Tennessee was formed by that earthquake, but most geologists now feel that Caddo Lake was formed gradually rather than catastrophically. The lake was formed, either gradually or catastrophically, by the “Great Raft,” a 100-mile (160-km) log jam on the Red River in Louisiana, possibly filling the basin that the intense uplift and shifting of the earthquake had created.

world-ocean-avenue:

Neon Jellyfish on the Beach

Awesome

world-ocean-avenue:

Neon Jellyfish on the Beach

Awesome

vurtual:

woah, glacier (by hannah-marie hepola)

Awesome

vurtual:

woah, glacier (by hannah-marie hepola)

Awesome