The Changing Climate
earthstory:

NIGARDSBREEN ICE CAVE, NORWAYThe photo shows a glacier pond in the glacier cave underneath the Nigardsbreen, Jostedalsbreen, Luster, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Up until 2006, the Jostedal glacier had been advancing throughout most of the last decade, despite many other glaciers around the world retreating during the same period. It was in the autumn of 2007 that researchers discovered a large and pristine ice cave beneath the Nigardsbreen region of Norway’s Jostedal Glacier National Park. Jostedalsbreen has an area of 487 sq km and is 600m thick in some places. The main icecap and several outliers are protected as the Jostedalsbreen National Park.The cave has a five metre opening into a grotto called by some an ‘ice cathedral’. Inside the cave the dome measures up to 8 metres in height, 30 metres deep and 20 metres wide. The cave has one main ‘hall’, with many details inside; these include structures that resemble neural networks, others that seem to be perfectly shaped holes, translucent ice, tunnels out in the open, and rocks frozen mid-movement. All these crystalline formations appear in deep crystalline blues, while the ceiling has large icicles protruding from it. The structures within the cave are constantly changing. The formation of the cave has been attributed to a bi-product of glacial melting as a result of a steadily warming climate. Large amounts of water, melted from the glacier, erode the inside of the cave. The runoff from the erosion accumulates within the lagoon in the grotto; the lagoon further encourages melting as it slightly warms the air trapped within the cave.-TELhttp://atlasobscura.com/place/nigardsbreen-ice-cave-skb; http://www.westcoastpeaks.com/Peaks/nigardsbreen1.html; http://www.lonelyplanet.com/norway/bergen-and-the-western-fjords/jostedalsbreen-and-nigardsbreen#ixzz2AzA41hkUImage credit: Guttorm Flatabø http://www.flickr.com/photos/dittaeva/3232155932/in/photostream/More images here: http://www.pbase.com/tormodiv/ice_cave

earthstory:

NIGARDSBREEN ICE CAVE, NORWAY

The photo shows a glacier pond in the glacier cave underneath the Nigardsbreen, Jostedalsbreen, Luster, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. Up until 2006, the Jostedal glacier had been advancing throughout most of the last decade, despite many other glaciers around the world retreating during the same period. It was in the autumn of 2007 that researchers discovered a large and pristine ice cave beneath the Nigardsbreen region of Norway’s Jostedal Glacier National Park. Jostedalsbreen has an area of 487 sq km and is 600m thick in some places. The main icecap and several outliers are protected as the Jostedalsbreen National Park.

The cave has a five metre opening into a grotto called by some an ‘ice cathedral’. Inside the cave the dome measures up to 8 metres in height, 30 metres deep and 20 metres wide. The cave has one main ‘hall’, with many details inside; these include structures that resemble neural networks, others that seem to be perfectly shaped holes, translucent ice, tunnels out in the open, and rocks frozen mid-movement. All these crystalline formations appear in deep crystalline blues, while the ceiling has large icicles protruding from it. The structures within the cave are constantly changing. 

The formation of the cave has been attributed to a bi-product of glacial melting as a result of a steadily warming climate. Large amounts of water, melted from the glacier, erode the inside of the cave. The runoff from the erosion accumulates within the lagoon in the grotto; the lagoon further encourages melting as it slightly warms the air trapped within the cave.

-TEL

http://atlasobscura.com/place/nigardsbreen-ice-cave-skbhttp://www.westcoastpeaks.com/Peaks/nigardsbreen1.htmlhttp://www.lonelyplanet.com/norway/bergen-and-the-western-fjords/jostedalsbreen-and-nigardsbreen#ixzz2AzA41hkU

Image credit: Guttorm Flatabø http://www.flickr.com/photos/dittaeva/3232155932/in/photostream/
More images here: http://www.pbase.com/tormodiv/ice_cave

ponderation:

The Field by Greg Boratyn

ponderation:

The Field by Greg Boratyn

earthstory:

This is an ice cave, known as “crystal Cave” on the frozen lagoon of the Svínafellsjökull glacier in Skaftafell, Iceland. This snow, which is up to 1000 years old, has metamorphosed into highly pressurized glacier ice that contains almost no air bubbles. The lack of air means that it absorbs almost all visible light, apart from the blue fraction which is then visible to the naked eye. This cave in the glacier ice is the result of glacial mill, or Moulin, where rain and melt water on the glacier surface are channeled into streams that enter the glacier at crevices. The water melts a hole into the glacier while the ponded water drains towards lower elevations by forming long ice caves with an outlet at the terminus of the glacier. This cave can only safely be accessed in winter, when the lagoon is thoroughly frozen over.-JeanFor more photos of ice caves see:http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/slideshow/stunning-images-europes-ice-caves-15909667Photo courtesy of Christian Klepp

Awesome

earthstory:

This is an ice cave, known as “crystal Cave” on the frozen lagoon of the Svínafellsjökull glacier in Skaftafell, Iceland. This snow, which is up to 1000 years old, has metamorphosed into highly pressurized glacier ice that contains almost no air bubbles. The lack of air means that it absorbs almost all visible light, apart from the blue fraction which is then visible to the naked eye. This cave in the glacier ice is the result of glacial mill, or Moulin, where rain and melt water on the glacier surface are channeled into streams that enter the glacier at crevices. The water melts a hole into the glacier while the ponded water drains towards lower elevations by forming long ice caves with an outlet at the terminus of the glacier. This cave can only safely be accessed in winter, when the lagoon is thoroughly frozen over.

-Jean

For more photos of ice caves see:http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/slideshow/stunning-images-europes-ice-caves-15909667

Photo courtesy of Christian Klepp

Awesome

de-preciated:

 (via Perito Moreno Glacier, Argentina | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)
The Perito Moreno Glacier is a glacier located in the Los Glaciares National Park in southwest Santa Cruz province, Argentina. It is one of the most important tourist attractions in the Argentine Patagonia.

The 250 km2 (97 sq mi) ice formation, and 30 km (19 mi) in length, is one of 48 glaciers fed by the Southern Patagonian Ice Field located in the Andes system shared with Chile. This icefield is the world's third largest reserve of fresh water.
Description Source

de-preciated:

(via Perito Moreno Glacier, Argentina | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

The Perito Moreno Glacier is a glacier located in the Los Glaciares National Park in southwest Santa Cruz province, Argentina. It is one of the most important tourist attractions in the Argentine Patagonia.

The 250 km2 (97 sq mi) ice formation, and 30 km (19 mi) in length, is one of 48 glaciers fed by the Southern Patagonian Ice Field located in the Andes system shared with Chile. This icefield is the world's third largest reserve of fresh water.
Description Source
rhysjonesaroundtheworld:

Franz Josef Glacier, NZ

rhysjonesaroundtheworld:

Franz Josef Glacier, NZ

travelingcolors:

Upper Reach of Hawkins Glacier | Alaska (by Wrangell-St. Elias National Park)
intothegreatunknown:

Meares Glacier | Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

Awesome
travelthisworld:

 Glacier “Perito Moreno” in Argentina. 
(source: mercadolibre)

travelthisworld:

 Glacier “Perito Moreno” in Argentina. 

(source: mercadolibre)

void-dance:

Greenpeace Switzerland raised awareness of the impact of climate change in 2007 with an award winning photo shoot on Altetsch Glacier. US installalation artist Spencer Tunick was recruited to photograph nearly 600 people removing their clothes and standing as naked testimony on the slopes of the glacier.
[more]

void-dance:

Greenpeace Switzerland raised awareness of the impact of climate change in 2007 with an award winning photo shoot on Altetsch Glacier. US installalation artist Spencer Tunick was recruited to photograph nearly 600 people removing their clothes and standing as naked testimony on the slopes of the glacier.

[more]