The Changing Climate
maptitude1:

This map shows the ratio of male to female children in China in the year 2000.

In the dark red places of this ther are only 100 girls for every 150 boys.
I fear that most of these boys have to find less traditional way of partnership. Stay single, become gay, share a girl with other boys or import brides from elswhere.
The one-child policy of past decades has a terrible effect for a traditional lifestyle.

maptitude1:

This map shows the ratio of male to female children in China in the year 2000.

In the dark red places of this ther are only 100 girls for every 150 boys.

I fear that most of these boys have to find less traditional way of partnership. Stay single, become gay, share a girl with other boys or import brides from elswhere.

The one-child policy of past decades has a terrible effect for a traditional lifestyle.

theworldofchinese:

REALLY IMPORTANT COMMUNIST PARTY MEETINGS, FOR DUMMIES

Meetings are bloody boring. Invariably, people just sit there pointlessly droning on and on, all while desperately trying to sound intelligent, productive, and like they vaguely know what they are doing. There are lots of ideas, things get jotted down, and the whole thing goes on for far too long. Nothing ever, ever gets done. Smart people make doodles while looking like they are taking notes. Others surreptitiously play Angry Birds on their phones. I tend to doze off and think about more important things, like lunch. Well, imagine what a Communist Party meeting is like. Yeah, pretty damn similar, and there are lots of them. Not a month goes by without talk of some really, really, high-level meeting, where incredibly important things get discussed, debated, and discussed some more.

There are so many of them it that it is all a bit mind-boggling. Here are a few of the big Party meetings explained:

1) National Congress of the Communist Party (中国共产党全国代表大会)

This one is big, so big in fact, that it only happens every five years. The last one (the 18th, 十八大) happened back in November 2012. It venue is always the Great Hall of the People in Beijing and comprises about 2,000 or so delegates who represent the Party.

Here they decide things like who gets to be the secretary general of Communist Party of China (CPC), on the Standing Committee of China’ s Politburo (中央政治局常委, the seven most powerful men in the Party), China’s Politburo (中央政治局委员, the top 25 men in the Party), and CPC’s Central Committee (中央委员, the top 350 or so cadres). If necessary, changes and review of the parties rules might also happen here, though it’s widely acknowledged that most important key decisions are actually made way in advance of the actual congress it itself.

2) CPC Central Committee Plenary Sessions (中国共产党中央委员会全体会议)

Now, over each five year term of the National Congress, the Party’s Central Committee has various meets up. These are called plenums and are, of course, very important—a lot of power is held here. There are usually seven of them, but there may be may be more. Each plenum has a specific function.

First Plenum (一中全会): usually happens as part of the National Congress of the Communist Party, and decides on who is in the Politburo, Standing Committee (top 25 guys in the party), and sets the future agenda.

Second Plenum (二中全会): This proposes candidates for the leadership personnel of the state government and the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (中国人民政治协商会议全国委员会), which are then ratified by the National People’s Congress (more of which later).

Third Plenum (三中全会): this is the Plenum superstar and more important than all the rest. It was the third plenum in 1978 (十一届三中全会) that decided on the Reform and Opening Up, and ever since this plenum has been about “deepening reform” and broad economic changes.

Fourth Plenum (四中全会): this one decides how to improve CPC governance. One can only imagine that there is a lot to talk about.

Fifth Plenum (五中全会): This introduces the CPC’s next five-year-plan. You really can’t beat a good five-year plan.

Sixth Plenum (六中全会): Discuss how to improve the general morality of society and CPC in addition to cultural reforms. Presumably another biggie.

Seventh Plenum (七中全会): Discuss the Politburo work report and decide the time for the next National Congress of the Communist Party.

3) Lianghui (两会, Two sessions

This is an annual meeting held in the spring, and is so-called because it is the meetings of two different assemblies: The National People’s Congress (NPC, 全国人民代表大会) and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative conference (CPPCC, 中国人民政治协商会议). The NPC is the nation’s 3,000 member legislature, and in theory holds the bulk of state-power…

Continue Reading Here.

griseus:

CONSTRUCTION OF NICARAGUA CANAL THREATENS A ENVIRONMENTAL CATASTROPHE

"It is not explained how this issue has escaped the ‘radar’ of large conservation organizations,"  "As this project has been presented is not sustainable environmentally or scientifically"

Nicaragua’s government last year granted a concession to a company in Hong Kong (China), virtually unknown, to build a canal passing through the Central American country, over 286 km from the Pacific to the Atlantic.

The grant includes the right to build industrial centers, airports, railway system, other pipelines and rights of expropriation of land and natural resources that are found along the way. Construction will begin later this year.

Although not decided the exact route of the canal, are known to cross the Great Lake of Nicaragua (Cocibolca), the largest drinking water reservoir in Central America and an area of ​​great biodiversity, forest and wetlands also of great ecological value. They also live in the various indigenous communities also threatened.

"This project could lead to the greatest environmental disaster in the region,"  alert Jorge Huete-Perez, director of the Center for Molecular Biology at the University of Central America, which is not explained how this issue has escaped the ‘radar’ of large conservation organizations.

Huete-Perez, along with biologist Axel Meyer at the University of Konstanz (Germany), demand this week in the journal Nature the need for an independent environmental impact assessment for this megaproject. So far the National Assembly of Nicaragua has rejected legal complaints against the concession.

The researcher stresses the environmental threat posed by the work: “It can cause irreparable damage, and lacustrine-marine-terrestrial ecosystems, have a devastating effect on the chemical and biological properties of rivers and lakes, harming the environment by the works of construction, excavation and dredging, and pollution that can produce large oil spills. “

This can also lead to the extinction of many endemic fish species of economic importance for tourism (sport fishing) and survival of poor coastal communities. In addition you can also encourage the introduction of invasive species.

According to the study, the channel infrastructure and other associated projects (pipelines, airports, industrial zones, etc..) Could also have a negative impact on migration patterns and biological dynamics of the terrestrial fauna.

MORE INFO: http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/06/nicaragua-takes-decisive-step-towards-chinese-construction-of-canal/

http://www.bnamericas.com/news/infrastructure/chinese-firm-to-develop-us20bn-panama-canal-alternative-in-honduras1

http://www.thenewamerican.com/world-news/north-america/item/16844-china-to-build-40-billion-canal-through-nicaragua

scmpnews:

Our infographic on shale gas in China.

As conventional natural gas becomes harder to extract, energy companies are now tapping so-called unconventional reserves—shale, coal bed methane, and a product called tight gas—that cling to rock, sandstones and coal. Companies use a variety of techniques to force out the gas tucked deep inside the earth’s layers.

(SCMP Graphic: Adolfo Arranz)
http://ow.ly/r8RJU

scmpnews:

Our infographic on shale gas in China.

As conventional natural gas becomes harder to extract, energy companies are now tapping so-called unconventional reservesshale, coal bed methane, and a product called tight gasthat cling to rock, sandstones and coal. Companies use a variety of techniques to force out the gas tucked deep inside the earth’s layers.

(SCMP Graphic: Adolfo Arranz)

http://ow.ly/r8RJU

cressence:


Spectacular Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China alice, mymodernmet.com
In the spring, the coun­try­side of Luop­ing in east­ern Yun­nan, China turns into an ocean of flow­ers. It’s that time of the year that the rape­seed flow­ers (or canola) are in full bloom. Pho­tog­ra­phers flock to this des­ti­na­tion to cap­tur…

Ocean of flowers in Yunnan, China 💛💚

cressence:

Spectacular Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China
alice, mymodernmet.com

In the spring, the coun­try­side of Luop­ing in east­ern Yun­nan, China turns into an ocean of flow­ers. It’s that time of the year that the rape­seed flow­ers (or canola) are in full bloom. Pho­tog­ra­phers flock to this des­ti­na­tion to cap­tur…

Ocean of flowers in Yunnan, China 💛💚

myhkdiary:

So here it is: Smog is even good for the economy, leading to the creation of new jobs! Mrs. Merkel, take heed!

Not only that, even the pharmaceutical industry can hope for better sales, now that even 8-year olds are getting lung cancer in China.

ecowatchorg:

Drop in Demand From China Threatens Australian Coal Mining Projects

Major Australian coal projects risk losing value due to falling demand from China, where leaders are increasingly concerned about growing public anger over severe air pollution, a new analysis fromOxford University has found.

Future coal mining projects are vulnerable to being “stranded” by a range of policy changes from the Chinese government, including environmental regulation, carbon pricing, investment in renewable energy and energy efficiency …

SEE MORE on EcoWatch:

http://ecowatch.com/2013/12/17/drop-in-demand-threatens-australian-coal-mining/


Smog Shrouds Eastern China
China suffered another severe bout of air pollution in December 2013. When the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image on December 7, 2013, thick haze stretched from Beijing to Shanghai, a distance of about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles). For comparison, that is about the distance between Boston, Massachusetts, and Raleigh, North Carolina. The brightest areas are clouds or fog. Polluted air appears gray. While northeastern China often faces outbreaks of extreme smog, it is less common for pollution to spread so far south.
“The fog has a smooth surface on the top, which distinguishes it from mid- and high-level clouds that are more textured and have distinct shadows on their edge,” explained Rudolf Husar, director of the Center for Air Pollution Impact and Trend Analysis at Washington University. “If there is a significant haze layer on top of the fog, it appears brownish. In this case, most of the fog over eastern China is free of elevated haze, and most of the pollution is trapped in the shallow winter boundary layer of a few hundred meters.”
On the day this natural-color image was acquired by Terra, ground-based sensors at U.S. embassies in Beijing and Shanghai reported PM2.5 measurements as high as 480 and 355 micrograms per cubic meter of air respectively. The World Health Organization considers PM2.5 levels to be safe when they are below 25.
Fine, airborne particulate matter (PM) smaller than 2.5 microns (about one thirtieth the width of a human hair) is considered dangerous because it is small enough to enter the passages of the human lungs. Most PM2.5 aerosol particles come from the burning of fossil fuels and of biomass (wood fires and agricultural burning).
At the time of the satellite image, the air quality index (AQI) reached 487 in Beijing and 404 in Shanghai. An AQI above 300 is considered hazardous to all humans, not just those with heart or lung ailments. AQI below 50 is considered good.
In some cities, authorities ordered school children to stay indoors, pulled government vehicles off the road, and halted construction in an attempt to reduce the smog, according to news reports.

References

Associated Press, via The Washington Post (2013, December 6) Smog at Extremely Hazardous levels in Shanghai.Accessed December 9, 2013.
Bloomberg News (2013, December 9) Shanghai Tells Children to Stay Inside for Seventh Day on Smog. Accessed December 9, 2013.
The New York Times (2013, December 5) Air Pollution Shrouds Eastern China. Accessed Accessed December 9, 2013.
U.S. Department of State (2013, December 9) U.S. Consulate Shanghai Air Quality Monitor. Accessed December 9, 2013.
U.S. Department of State (2013, December 9) U.S Embassy Beijing Air Quality Monitor. Accessed December 9, 2013.
Voice of America (2013, December 6) Flights Delayed as Air Pollution Hits Record in Shanghai. Accessed December 9, 2013.
Xinhua (2013, December 9) Cities hit hard by smog. Accessed December 9, 2013.
NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE MODIS Rapid Response. Caption by Adam Voiland.
Instrument: Terra - MODIS

Smog Shrouds Eastern China

China suffered another severe bout of air pollution in December 2013. When the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image on December 7, 2013, thick haze stretched from Beijing to Shanghai, a distance of about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles). For comparison, that is about the distance between Boston, Massachusetts, and Raleigh, North Carolina. The brightest areas are clouds or fog. Polluted air appears gray. While northeastern China often faces outbreaks of extreme smog, it is less common for pollution to spread so far south.

“The fog has a smooth surface on the top, which distinguishes it from mid- and high-level clouds that are more textured and have distinct shadows on their edge,” explained Rudolf Husar, director of the Center for Air Pollution Impact and Trend Analysis at Washington University. “If there is a significant haze layer on top of the fog, it appears brownish. In this case, most of the fog over eastern China is free of elevated haze, and most of the pollution is trapped in the shallow winter boundary layer of a few hundred meters.”

On the day this natural-color image was acquired by Terra, ground-based sensors at U.S. embassies in Beijing and Shanghai reported PM2.5 measurements as high as 480 and 355 micrograms per cubic meter of air respectively. The World Health Organization considers PM2.5 levels to be safe when they are below 25.

Fine, airborne particulate matter (PM) smaller than 2.5 microns (about one thirtieth the width of a human hair) is considered dangerous because it is small enough to enter the passages of the human lungs. Most PM2.5 aerosol particles come from the burning of fossil fuels and of biomass (wood fires and agricultural burning).

At the time of the satellite image, the air quality index (AQI) reached 487 in Beijing and 404 in Shanghai. An AQI above 300 is considered hazardous to all humans, not just those with heart or lung ailments. AQI below 50 is considered good.

In some cities, authorities ordered school children to stay indoors, pulled government vehicles off the road, and halted construction in an attempt to reduce the smog, according to news reports.

  1. References

  2. Associated Press, via The Washington Post (2013, December 6) Smog at Extremely Hazardous levels in Shanghai.Accessed December 9, 2013.
  3. Bloomberg News (2013, December 9) Shanghai Tells Children to Stay Inside for Seventh Day on Smog. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  4. The New York Times (2013, December 5) Air Pollution Shrouds Eastern China. Accessed Accessed December 9, 2013.
  5. U.S. Department of State (2013, December 9) U.S. Consulate Shanghai Air Quality Monitor. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  6. U.S. Department of State (2013, December 9) U.S Embassy Beijing Air Quality Monitor. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  7. Voice of America (2013, December 6) Flights Delayed as Air Pollution Hits Record in Shanghai. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  8. Xinhua (2013, December 9) Cities hit hard by smog. Accessed December 9, 2013.

NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE MODIS Rapid Response. Caption by Adam Voiland.

Instrument: Terra - MODIS

wildcat2030:

New airport terminal puts Shenzen on the global architecture map

After a build time of only three years and a budget of US$1 billion, the new Terminal 3 Building at Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport, designed by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas, makes a dramatic architectural statement. This is the first airport project for the Rome-based architects and one intended to launch them into the frontline of high-design transport terminals. The building runs 1.5 km (5,000 ft) in length, covering an internal area of half a million square meters (5.4 million sq ft). But its most striking achievement may be its unusual form, which the architects liken to a “manta ray,” and its textured “double” skin. As the home to the country’s fourth largest airport, and one that requires a visa for entry by foreign visitors, Shenzhen seems an unlikely site for such an eye-catching building. However, the project wears the sculptural design with the confidence of a major international hub, a sign of the city’s growing prominence within China, but also of the country’s continuing penchant for large-scale, high-profile architecture commissions, (via New airport terminal puts Shenzen on the global architecture map)

thelandofmaps:

China’s Global Economic Footprint: China is the largest trading partner for all red countries [2446x1370]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

China’s Global Economic Footprint: China is the largest trading partner for all red countries [2446x1370]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com