The Changing Climate
think-progress:

“Fully combating climate change is going to require women’s full empowerment everywhere.”
544 young women want to tell the UN about the urgency of climate change.

think-progress:

“Fully combating climate change is going to require women’s full empowerment everywhere.”

544 young women want to tell the UN about the urgency of climate change.

saveplanetearth:

Shell just announced its official plans to drill in the Arctic in 2015. Sign the petition to stop them @ Greenpeace

saveplanetearth:

Shell just announced its official plans to drill in the Arctic in 2015. Sign the petition to stop them @ Greenpeace

evgeniemalkin:

stoneagechronicles:

punkqueer:

TAKE ACTION

Post to your Facebook & Twitter: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/2594-july-4th-protest-nsa-spying

Protest on July 4th: http://www.RestoreTheFourth.net

Find out about other actions: http://CallForFreedom.org

Not normally this blog’s topic, but this needs to be spread like crazy. Internet privacy is a big fucking deal, and 83 notes on this as I reblog this is pathetic.

ok so now the government knows I have an unquenchable thirst for older men great

Bruce Davidson - Time of Change: Civil Rights Photographs, 1961-1965 (via)

mypubliclands:

#ActOnClimate because our kids and grandkids should be able to enjoy beautiful places like these.

The EPA today released a proposal that will set the first-ever national carbon pollution standards limits for America’s existing power plants. Find out how the rules will make our communities healthier, and learn more about the President’s plan to cut carbon pollution in America.

Today, post photos of your favorite places, of places where you and your family get outdoors, and tag with #ActOnClimate.  We’ll post our favorites here on My Public Lands Tumblr!

View more beautiful BLM-managed places on the BLM’s My Public Lands Flickr site; photos here by Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist.
sagansense:

As the realization of climate change moves from urgency topic to immediate implementation, urban city planning involving infrastructure assessment and home energy usage will be the most visible factors to which we gauge the direction we’re collectively moving as a society.
From the referenced Laboratory Equipment article:

“Climate change isn’t an isolated issue,” says Alexander Aylett, a postdoc in MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP), and the lead author of today’s report. “It has large implications for all other aspects of urban life. What we are seeing is cities starting to build it into the DNA of how they approach urban planning.”
According to the findings, 75 percent of cities worldwide now tackle climate-change issues as a mainstream part of their planning, and 73 percent of cities are attempting both climate mitigation and climate adaptation — that is, they are trying both to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and to adapt to long-term changes that are already in motion. But only 21 percent of cities report tangible connections between the response to climate change and achieving other local development goals.


And if you haven’t realized how distorted (for lack of a better word) the arid aroma of ignorance is amidst mainstream reporting to the general public regarding the severity of climate change is to our way of life, not to mention our civilization and all species on this planet…this transition from the ways of old to the ways of right freaking now…is not going to happen overnight.
However, one of my favorite cities - Portland, Oregon - is setting a pretty ideal example. Again, from the article:

Aylett calls it a cliché that environmental and economic progress cannot coexist, citing a number of cities where jobs and growth have derived from climate-change efforts. Portland, Oregon, he observes, developed incentives, training and regulations to help sustainable construction firms grow, while a pilot program called Clean Energy Works Portland employed 400 workers to reduce home energy use, reducing carbon emissions by 1,400 metric tons annually.
Urban planners in Alberta, as Aylett notes, have studied the cost savings associated with limiting metropolitan sprawl and concluded that denser development could save $11 billion in capital costs over the next 60 years, and $130 million in annual maintenance. But most cities, he suggests, have simply not yet identified ways to link climate planning and economic development in the first place.
“It isn’t so much that it’s hard to reconcile economic and environmental priorities,” Aylett says. “It’s that we’re not trying.”


And *shocker* - the United States is sluggishly struggling to make any headway, projecting unto the world their lack of responsibility and stewardship as fellow inhabitants of this planet.
Yet another clear reminder of how important communication is amongst our scientifically illiterate society plagued by an intellectual drought only proper education may be the key to mitigating, if not outright curing.
Read the rest via Laboratory Equipment…

sagansense:

As the realization of climate change moves from urgency topic to immediate implementation, urban city planning involving infrastructure assessment and home energy usage will be the most visible factors to which we gauge the direction we’re collectively moving as a society.

From the referenced Laboratory Equipment article:

“Climate change isn’t an isolated issue,” says Alexander Aylett, a postdoc in MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP), and the lead author of today’s report. “It has large implications for all other aspects of urban life. What we are seeing is cities starting to build it into the DNA of how they approach urban planning.”

According to the findings, 75 percent of cities worldwide now tackle climate-change issues as a mainstream part of their planning, and 73 percent of cities are attempting both climate mitigation and climate adaptation — that is, they are trying both to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and to adapt to long-term changes that are already in motion. But only 21 percent of cities report tangible connections between the response to climate change and achieving other local development goals.

And if you haven’t realized how distorted (for lack of a better word) the arid aroma of ignorance is amidst mainstream reporting to the general public regarding the severity of climate change is to our way of life, not to mention our civilization and all species on this planet…this transition from the ways of old to the ways of right freaking now…is not going to happen overnight.

However, one of my favorite cities - Portland, Oregon - is setting a pretty ideal example. Again, from the article:

Aylett calls it a cliché that environmental and economic progress cannot coexist, citing a number of cities where jobs and growth have derived from climate-change efforts. Portland, Oregon, he observes, developed incentives, training and regulations to help sustainable construction firms grow, while a pilot program called Clean Energy Works Portland employed 400 workers to reduce home energy use, reducing carbon emissions by 1,400 metric tons annually.

Urban planners in Alberta, as Aylett notes, have studied the cost savings associated with limiting metropolitan sprawl and concluded that denser development could save $11 billion in capital costs over the next 60 years, and $130 million in annual maintenance. But most cities, he suggests, have simply not yet identified ways to link climate planning and economic development in the first place.

“It isn’t so much that it’s hard to reconcile economic and environmental priorities,” Aylett says. “It’s that we’re not trying.”

And *shocker* - the United States is sluggishly struggling to make any headway, projecting unto the world their lack of responsibility and stewardship as fellow inhabitants of this planet.

Yet another clear reminder of how important communication is amongst our scientifically illiterate society plagued by an intellectual drought only proper education may be the key to mitigating, if not outright curing.

Read the rest via Laboratory Equipment

ecowatchorg:

Crowdsourced ‘Climate Victory’ Campaign Works to Decarbonize Our World and Defeat Climate Change
A new collaboration was launched today between the Creative Action Network, 350.org, Marcacci Communications and Green Patriot Posters to “illustrate the battles we’re winning in the fight to decarbonize our world and defeat climate change.”
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/27/climate-victory-decarbonize-climate-change/

ecowatchorg:

Crowdsourced ‘Climate Victory’ Campaign Works to Decarbonize Our World and Defeat Climate Change

A new collaboration was launched today between the Creative Action Network, 350.org, Marcacci Communications and Green Patriot Posters to “illustrate the battles we’re winning in the fight to decarbonize our world and defeat climate change.”

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/27/climate-victory-decarbonize-climate-change/

missvoltairine:

phil-irish-artist:

By copyrighting his property as an artwork, he has prevented oil companies from drilling on it.

Peter Von Tiesenhausen has developed artworks all over his property in northern Alberta.  There’s a boat woven from sticks that is gradually being reclaimed by the land; there is a fence that he adds to each year of his life, and there are many “watching” trees, with eyes scored into their bark.

Oil interests pester him continually about drilling on his land.  His repeated rebuffing of their advances lead them to move toward arbitration.  They made it very clear that he only owned the top 6 inches of soil, and they had rights to anything underneath.  He then, off the top of his head, threatened them that he would sue damages if they disturbed his 6 inches, for the entire property is an artwork.  Any disturbance would compromise the work, and he would sue.

Immediately after that meeting, he called a lawyer (who is also an art collector) and asked if his intuitive threat would actually hold legally.  The lawyer visited, saw the scope of the work on the property, and wrote a document protecting the artwork.

The oil companies have kept their distance ever since.

This is but one example of Peter’s ability to negotiate quickly on his feet, and to find solutions that defy expectations.

I feel like this is really important.