The Changing Climate
ohstarstuff:

Connecting the cosmos to the clouds, Paul Williams captured this extremely rare and magical view of the aurora from the window of a transatlantic flight between London and New York. 

ohstarstuff:

Connecting the cosmos to the clouds, Paul Williams captured this extremely rare and magical view of the aurora from the window of a transatlantic flight between London and New York. 

flitterling:

Auroras of the White Sea (Russia) by Alexander Semenov

Awesome

ponderation:

Road to Nowhere by Tor-Ivar Næss 

Awesome

ponderation:

Road to Nowhere by Tor-Ivar Næss

Awesome

Aurora Realtime Motion, awesome, must see

tr3slikes:

tr3slikes:Acrtic Lights (por Ben H.)

Awesome

tr3slikes:

tr3slikes:
Acrtic Lights (por Ben H.)

Awesome

etherealvistas:

Ice in the Glacial Lagoon (Iceland) by Derek Kind

etherealvistas:

Ice in the Glacial Lagoon (Iceland) by Derek Kind

the-science-llama:

The color of the Aurora depends on the altitude and the atom being struck by solar radiation (causing excitation). At higher altitudes, there is more Atomic Oxygen than Nitrogen, leading to the common color stratifications you see.

500-200 km altitude
— Atomic Oxygen — Red
200-100 km
— Atomic Oxygen — Greenish-Yellow
— Ionized Nitrogen — Blue/Purple
100-80 km
— Nitrogen (N2) — Crimson

Oxygen only emits red at higher altitudes because once it’s excited, it takes a longer time to emit red than it does green. Why is that important? Well, at lower altitudes there is more Nitrogen for the Oxygen to bump into and absorb that excitation-energy before it gets a chance to emit red light. In this case, where the collision occurs, the Oxygen will emit Green and at low enough altitudes the Nitrogen-Oxygen collisions eventually prevent Oxygen from emitting any light at all.

During stronger storms, high energy solar particles will reach lower in the atmosphere and cause the Crimson emission from Nitrogen, creating a deep-red band at the lower edge of the aurora. Other elements emit light too, like Hydrogen (Blue) or Helium (Purple) which are at higher altitudes.

Sources and further reading:
WebExhibits
ExploratoriumWindow2UniverseWikiGif source

celestialreconnaissance:

the-science-llama:

Aurora Borealis

It basically looks like this IRL. Silent. Wavey. Fluid. Just cool.

celestialreconnaissance:

the-science-llama:

Aurora Borealis

It basically looks like this IRL. Silent. Wavey. Fluid. Just cool.

earthstory:

Aurora over Vatnajokull Shimmering eerily over Iceland’s largest glacier, streams of glowing plasma charged by the sun’s emmanations are reflected in lake Jokulsarlon. Hovering between them are some odd shaped lenticular clouds, with the upper ones shimmering with their own iridescence. Just below the clouds, Luna is setting. Loz Image credit: Stephane Vetter, via APOD

Awesome

earthstory:

Aurora over Vatnajokull

Shimmering eerily over Iceland’s largest glacier, streams of glowing plasma charged by the sun’s emmanations are reflected in lake Jokulsarlon. Hovering between them are some odd shaped lenticular clouds, with the upper ones shimmering with their own iridescence. Just below the clouds, Luna is setting.

Loz

Image credit: Stephane Vetter, via APOD

Awesome

h4ilstorm:

Aurora Borealis (by Jokull)

Awesome

h4ilstorm:

Aurora Borealis (by Jokull)

Awesome